Why are we fascinated by butterflies?

Butterflies have always served as a metaphor for transformation and resurrection. The grace, beauty and wonderful ability to transform from lowly caterpillars into amazing butterflies fascinate numerous people. But did you know that there are about 18,000 species of known butterflies? Plus, they taste with their feet. Here are some interesting facts you might not know about these magical creatures.

Interesting facts about butterflies

It might sound impossible, but butterflies wings are actually transparent. Because their wings consist in multiple thin layers of chitin, you can see through them. But some butterflies have thousands of tiny scales that cover the transparent chitin so butterflies will have bright and colourful wings. Yet as it gets older, these scales will fall off and the chitin layer will be exposed, somehow unprotected.

Butterflies feed with nectar and their taste receptors are located on their feet, meaning that they taste with the feet. The proboscis works as a drinking straw, but it remains curled under the butterfly’s chin until it will find the liquid nutrition. Although the sugar from nectar is great for butterflies, the truth is that these creatures will need minerals too in order to stay alive. Thus they will sip from mud puddles the salts and minerals that a female will need to improve the viability of the eggs.

A butterfly will live for only 2-4 weeks but it will dedicate its whole life to eating and mating. They can see and discriminate numerous colours, but they cannot fly if they are cold. Due to fact they cannot regulate their own body temperatures, they need a warm breeze in order to be able to fly around and eat. if some butterflies wear vibrant colours to announce their presence, others will use camouflage to protect from predators. How can you not be passionate about butterflies?


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